Iycee Charles de Gaulle Summary NASCAR Driver Essay

NASCAR Driver Essay

NASCAR DriverIntroduction         In the United States, the Stock car racing business and trends of driving careers has provided significant trademark in NASCAR (National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing), which is considered as the main stock body of cars in the United States . With the three most popular events hosted by NASCAR, namely Sprint Cup, Nationwide Series and the Craftsman Truck Series, the field of driving careers for NASCAR racers have boosted within the courts of these significant races.

Stock car drivers, like the horsemen of the American West, occupy a special place within American culture. According to Howell (1987), the stock car racing is a fertile field of creation of such folk legends (115). Even the mainstream media has considered its trends as one of the greatest forces in American athletics and car stock racing. Throughout time, the development of the NASCAR racing firm has expanded greatly to the point of conferring various forms of opportunities and wide scale of compensation possibilities.

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The simple firm of car racing has evolved to something the modified the American culture of racing through NASCAR.         Within the study, the main task is to uncover the conditions of NASCAR drivers and the opportunities open to them. With the expansion of NASCAR driving careers in United States, every racer obtains significant compensation and lucrative tendencies, especially if popularity surge them. However, being a NASCAR driver should also be considered. Hence, in this study, the discussion includes the career of being a NASCAR driver, the becoming and the opportunities present in being a NASCAR driver.  .

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DiscussionCareer as a NASCAR Driver         NASCAR driving has evolved from the early 1900s to present with the extensive technology of cars available now and the popularity NASCAR acquires from the American body, which is their number one supporters. In the last 52 years of sock car business, NASCAR has progressed from racing on dirt tracks, sandy beaches and short tracks to professional speedways, and it has remained in the hands of its first contractor. The fields of Auto-racing in general have been supported by the American culture, and the stock racing in particular has experienced significant growth over the last decade. The surge of NASCAR popularity has only started in small crowds until it reaches a maximum attendance of more than 190,000 people in just one event.

With this ranging popularity in the field of stock racing, NASCAR careers have also boosted to another level.         The careers of NASCAR racing is something not easily achieved without an evident expertise in the field of stock racing. Somehow, NASCAR has considered professional drivers, and unlike in the past where sponsorship for car stock racing obtains their racers in junior clubs, such as SCCA, etc., the trend now is different since these racers should have their professional inclinations and mastery of the skill prior to NASCAR career (Lee and Lee 6).

In starting-off in this kind of career, most racers prefer to have it formally like a short-course formal education from a well-known or credible stock racing schools. In stock racing schools, the fundamentals of racing, car technicalities and rules of the game are being taught and not only involving race trainings.         Upon obtaining the mastery and skills for stock racing, the individual should enter in junior to junior pro racing tournaments in order to obtain records of racing as well as credentials.

At first experience, stock racing may not be as lucrative as those seen in expert racers, but in building up fame in stock racing, it is important to gather these kinds of credentials, such as Local National series, junior pro racing series, etc. The winning from stock races and certain credentials can provide a highlight for possible discovery in this type of career. With the increasing credentials, the driver’s popularity usually comes next. Basically, the career of stock racing lacks formality and not like the ones being taken up as college courses, rather, this racing career depends on the spotlight.Becoming a NASCAR Driver         Being a NASCAR driver possesses significant financial advantage over the other driving careers.

Aside from the fact that these drivers control their own licensing and souvenir sales, compensations from different angles are being obtained by these drivers. One of the most important starting notes that need to be considered by every NASCAR newbie is the task requirement of having a background in the field of racing. Most commonly, the local racetracks are the perfect way to harness and develop the skills of those who want to be on the field. Upon obtaining the necessary skills, having a formal mentorship is essential. Famous racers, such as Jack Gordon, Steve Chassey, etc, have tried being under a school course program for stock racers (Bentley and Cleland 44). However, these schools do not provide the guarantee of a lucrative career behind stock racing. In fact, these schools only cater skill enhancements and trainings in order to foster the potentials of their racers.

         Ralph Earnhardt, on of the earliest racers of the 1940s, has managed to finance his own racing career by having a fine-tuning motors in North Carolina auto shop. He has decided to use his savings to fund his career of NASCAR driving. Earnhardt is actually not only a good racer but, most especially, has a commendable knowledge in motor parts that provided him the edge in manipulating the technical aspects of his car. On the downside, these schools do not focus much on car technicalities and aerodynamics that need to be considered in car racing. The governing principle is to harness the skills of the drier and not the capacity of the car; however, these factors still need to be considered when starting out in stock racing career (Lazarus 186).

Considering that the important aspect of the sport is to learn the testing skills and the technical aspects of the sport, it is essential to learn terms, such as spring, anti-roll back, shock, or aero changes, which are included in the school series.  . . . . . .

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. . . .         After developing the skills in stock car driving, the next important step is to obtain the necessary experience in order to start the game. It is important to consider building up the driver’s reputation through annually held championships or tournaments (Bentley and Cleland 44). The downside, however, of this kind of sport is the costs of the cars themselves.

Each racer should have a budget of at least $500,000 and up to be able to afford the least decent stock cars available in the market. On the other hand, these drivers can utilize rents in order to highlight their skills in the track field. If in case some endorsers or sponsors are willing to invest on the driver’s skills, then this forms another break for the stock racer.

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. .         For becoming a NASCAR driver, there is no definite path and the practicality is realistically not present. Most often than not, those graduates from stock racing schools end up not practicing their skills in driving. Due to the expensive car showcases and the absence of sponsors to support the driver’s need, these drivers loss their fashion in racing. Education and break in the industry are the two important considerations that have to be made in order to be a NASCAR driver. Once a driver is able to get a good representation offer from a sponsor representative, it is important to have this opportunity maximized.

In conclusion of this section, becoming a NASCAR driver do possess an actual determined pattern, but rather, it is the opportunity present in the scenario as well as breaks that can provide the benefit of entering the field. . . . .

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. .Opportunities Present in NASCAR DrivingThe business of NASCAR has given absolute trademark and growth in the lucrative career of racing. Its growth and popularity has reached tremendous earnings from the NASCAR merchandise alone, which even surged up to $80 million in just an annual scope in 1999. With the growing marketing trends in NASCAR, drivers hold a significant financial advantage over athletes in other fields of racing sports as they manipulate their licensing and souvenir sales. The licensing scheme in NASCAR involves individual teams or drivers under cross-licensing agreements. NASCAR drivers are provided with sets of package agreements, although there are really not considered as employed or property of the firm. Each driver is an independent contractor that takes control of his licensing depending on the negotiations.

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Aside from the licensing revenues of the NASCAR drivers, a new way of opportunity is provided by sponsorship. The idea of sponsorship in NASCAR has catered large part of compensation, especially for the drivers. Rosner and Shropshire (1987) even named this as the backbone of the sport (304). Today, the most significant means of creating revenues from NASCAR driving are through sponsorship in exchange for advertisements of sponsoring products embedded in the driver’s cars or uniforms. The income of the driver varies on different setups and types of game they are racing (Bentley and Cleland 44). . .

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. . . . .Aside from this given opportunities, rumors say that these famed NASCAR drivers are being paid underground with millions of dollars. In fact, considering SCCA (Sports Car Club of America), they sponsor amateur and professional racing in many forms despite of the thousand members they have for their race. According to Nelson (1999), the income of these NASCAR racers is also complicated since drivers are being paid from many different angles (119).

For NASCAR, they credit their drivers, which are substantial. For example, in 1994, the earnings of Dale Earnhardt have reached $3,400,733 for the Winston Cup driving, which is his third year over $3 million. On the other hand, the other ten drivers have won $1million and these prices are split for the driver and the owners of the car. Meanwhile, in other setup, the drivers are being paid by the owners of the car, while other transactions are kept underground. In addition, endorsements are being utilized as another form of paying the drivers. Income varies depending on the driver and the type of race being emphasized.

Some NASCAR drivers prefer to own their cars; however, many do not, because of not only the expensive cost of the car itself, but also the maintenance it requires. According to Nelson (1999), the cost of running a NASCAR stock car can cost up to $40,000 per hour or more (320). The only reason profit gains are high in racing is because large corporations have realized the potential of car racing for advertisements, which significantly provided the field with increased sponsorships.  On the other hand, some racers prefer to own their cars in the beginning since having a sponsor to facilitate the finance requirements in this type of field is very much difficult to acquire. The most difficult part of working up the big-money races is finding somebody who will let drivers drive a car.

Conclusion         In the conclusion of the subject about NASCAR drivers, the discussion has provided significant information in terms of the careers and opportunities present in NASCAR driving. For a driver to reach the goal of driving under NASCAR, the path is not easy to attain due to high-cost of requirements (e.g. car, car maintenance, etc.

), the need to build up reputation and credentials, and the appropriate education. On the other hand, the earnings and compensation can surge from $40,000 and above depending on the level of driver’s profession.Works CitedBentley, Ross, and Bruce Cleland .

Speed Secrets 5: The Complete Driver. MotorBooks/MBI Publishing Company, 2006.Cordner, Nelson. Careers in Pro Sports. The Rosen Publishing Group, 1999.Howell, Mark D.

From Moonshine to Madison Avenue. Popular Press, 1987.Lazarus, Bill. The Sands of Time: A Century of Racing in Daytona Beach. Sports Publishing LLC, 2004.Lee, Richard, and Mary Lee. Careers for Car Buffs & Other Freewheeling Types.

McGraw-Hill Professional, 2004.McCormick, Steve. The First Step to Becoming a NASCAR Driver. 1 Jan. 1 Jan. <http://nascar.about.com/cs/nascar101/a/getstarted.

htm>.Rosner, Scott, and Kenneth L. Shropshire. The business of sports.

Jones & Bartlett Publishers, 1987.