Iycee Charles de Gaulle Summary Mona Lisa Reproduction Essay

Mona Lisa Reproduction Essay

   As the work of Leonardo de Vinci, the Mona Lisa is the most famous painting to be on display.  .  However, in recent years as advertisements have grown and developed, the Mona Lisa has become an icon.  The vision of the lady can be found in the most bizarre places.  The image is transformed to baseball hats, coffee cups and even as far as a Mona Lisa toe ring.  Would de Vinci approve of such insignificant items of the world’s most renowned lady?  Do these objects immortalize the Mona Lisa or are they merely used as a prominent face to sell more merchandise?

   Pictures were the beginning form of communication. However, images have become lost in translation.  Words have proved to be more clear and comprehensible.  Illustrations bestow expressions quickly but the meaning can be interpreted in different ways.  When an impression is drawn the artist knows exactly what they are trying to portray.  While other people are viewing the image, there can be various ways to analyze the significance. What one individual understands may not be what the creator intended.  Stephens stated, “The other great obstacle to images forming a language of their own stems not from their muteness but from the fact that they tend to say to much.”  This statement proclaims that all images can be expressed in a smaller fashion with words.

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   The Mona Lisa articulates passion; the portrait tells a story only the artist is honestly familiar with.  When that appearance is changed or altered even slightly it diminishes the quality of the work.  The words that are trying to be spoken through the masterpiece lose value with every alteration.  The painting may be more famous now than it ever has been.  However, that is not worth the sacrifice of the weakened significance.  The Mona Lisa dressed up as different images deprive the appreciation of precious art.  Lowering the exquisiteness of any artwork for personal gain or to make a statement, takes away from the intended display.  Recreating someone’s imaginative design would be called misappropriation.  Nevertheless, people do this all the time to sell products and promote companies.

   “Words also can say too much, of course.  Man, woman, or god, for example, have no shortage of potential meanings.  Dictionaries contain lists of them; occasionally we concoct our own.” Stephens said.  This theory is completely accurate.  Every word or form can be interpreted in different context.  Some scholars may hear the words Mona Lisa and think of the painting by de Vinci.  Others, of course, may think of the barn they saw on their road trip or the new line of cereal.  Diverse content is what makes words so functional.  A sentence can involve three people reading three distinctive passages; all three individuals can come away from the text with different interpretations.  When an object is distorted seeing the change can unlock different thought patterns.  Various ideas can enhance a piece or destroy the significance of such example.

   Sometimes an image can be taken from a source and transformed into something very breathtaking.  Various artists can create such masterpieces then in another individuals mind can be adapted for a new purpose.  Any distortion can be described as dreadful, though.  It does not matter how well done or tasteful the change was made.  Every person’s views are different.  The ideas that surround creative compositions of art may be objectionable to certain individuals.  When does art become repugnant?

   Finding a design so mutilated that it almost looks like a whole different piece can be construed as stealing a backdrop.  It is inconceivable to believe that borrowing someone else’s hard work is the correct thing to do.  However, this is being done every day.

Taking an image as well known as the Mona Lisa then shifting the ideas around to profit off the image is inappropriate.  The ideas and feelings, which go into a painting of this magnitude, cannot be recreated.  Any aspect of a design as famous and understood should not be redrawn as a tee shirt or a coffee cup.

   Representations can be deceiving.  “Our strategies for reading words are fairly well understood.  We can, at least, make use of those dictionaries, with their limited list of meanings.  And the problem of comprehending words is further eased, if never entirely eliminated, by syntax.”  Stephens suggested.  When artwork is designed and created, only one person knows the importance.  Then other people contemplate what is being said in their own mind.  What Stephens alluded to, when working with images so many different impressions are discovered.  With plain words only certain ideas can come from them.  Words alone can be the stepping-stone to the true message of an object.  On the other hand, pictures can open up each individual’s thoughts and desires.

   In conclusion, the Mona Lisa is being administered as an object it was not designed for.  There are images of this painting hoola-dancing and being exploited as a baseball fan, this is a ridiculous spectacle.  A number of inspirations unfold with this art form, which is a great idea.  However, when it becomes a showpiece for the weirdest advertisement schemes, this is the time to speak out.  Compelling an achievement of this degree and force market frenzies is wrong.  It is obvious that the manufacturers of these products disagree.  However, the consumers are still feeding the market for these dupes.  Without the need for the product, the merchandise would not exist.

Work Citation

Stephens, Mitchell. “By Means Of The Visible.”

   Picturing Texts: 56-66

Baron, Robert. “Mona Lisa Images For A Modern World.”

   2004. < http://www.studiolo.org/Mona/MONALIST.htm>.