Iycee Charles de Gaulle Summary Environmental Issues: Noise Control and Radon Essay

Environmental Issues: Noise Control and Radon Essay

I.  Nightclub, noise and public health – The irresponsible operation of a nightclub may cause noise pollution to the immediate environment. Noise pollution is a source of many important health problems. “Noise can lead to ear damage on a temporary (acute) or permanent (chronic) basis (Hughes, 2007, p. 260),” particularly temporary threshold shift, tinnitus and acute acoustic trauma.

Other effects of noise manifest not just in the auditory part of the body but also in other aspects of health, like in the occurrence of hypertension as well as the increase in stress levels in a person, while sleep disturbance is also attributed to the effects of noise. The respectable World Health Organization even attests to the health impacts of noise.Restrictions you would recommend the city requires the new nightclub to meet before granting an approval – The city should require the club to follow rules that regulate noise and sound levels in the neighbourhood, so that the club is allowed to operate without putting the neighbourhood under stress. This is because of high levels of noise emitting from the club, especially since night time – the usual operating hours of clubs – is, for most people, the time for sleep and rest. Following sound and noise restrictions (e.g.

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sound system installation, acoustic and sound proof design of the interior of the club, etc) is the most important requirement that the club should adhere to and the city should impose before allowing the club to operate. Upon the failure to do so consistently during the times the club operated and violated sound and noise level laws, members of the neighbourhood can sue the company and move for its closure and stoppage in operation. Legal options are available so that the neighbourhood and the people’s health and interest are protected. “A number of common-law theories may be used to establish claims for compensatory damages or injunctive relief from excessive noise. Common-law claims may be based on nuisance, trespass and inverse condemnation theories, but nuisance is the most common and successful claim for relief from noise on neighbourhood land (Berry, Dennison, 2000, p. 27).

”II. Radon gas and home safety and health – One of the aspects of home inspection when safety is concerned is the measurement of radon exposure because there are many different health effects that exposure to radon brings to an individual, depending on the condition and gravity of the exposure. Homes are no exemption to the threat of radon exposure since radon emits from earth where most housing structures are found.Professionals have identified many serious health threats from radon exposure, but the most serious threat of radon exposure is cancer. “Prolonged exposure to high concentrations of radon can cause cancer (Becker, 2002, p. 260).” This threat is real even inside homes since there are cases wherein homes have a higher radon exposure levels compared to mining or nuclear plant locations, like the situation Becker (2002) narrated in the book on radon and home inspection.

“A worker in a nuclear generating plant passed through a radiation detection monitor as he entered the plant. It turned out that his home had twenty times more radiation than is allowed in a uranium mine (Becker, 2002, p. 260).”Testing radon – It is important that home owners are knowledgeable in the processes involved in radon detection to keep the people living inside the house safe from the health effects of radon exposure.

“According to EPA guidance, homes with radon levels in excess of 150 Bq/m3 should be remediated. This requires that every home be tested for radon because that is the only way to identify which ones have high radon levels (Mossman, 2006, p. 160).” Addressing radon presence at home is manageable. “Professional inspectors can test for radon or you can purchase a do-it-yourself test kit with mail-in results (Rifkin, Bouwer, 2007, p. 132).” According to Rifkin and Bouwer (2007), a person owning a house can also resort to practical approaches so that radon is ventilated out of the house by installing a vent system and by sealing any cracks found in the walls and foundations of the house.

These efforts are guaranteed by professionals to reduce radon levels inside the house, making the people at home less vulnerable to the health effects of radon exposure.ReferencesBecker, Norman (June 2002). Complete Book of Home Inspection. The McGraw-HillCompanies.Berry, James F., Dennison, Mark S. (May 2000).

The Environmental Law and ComplianceHandbook. McGraw – Hill Professional.Field, J.M. (1993). Effect of personal and situational variables upon noise annoyance inresidential areas. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 93: 2753-2763.Hughes, Phil (October 2007).

Introduction to Health and Safety at Work: The Handbook forthe NEBOSH National General Certificate. Elsevier Science and Technology Books.Mossman, Kenneth (October 2006). Radiation Risks in Perspective: Assessment and Controlof Exposure. CRC Press.

Rifkin, Erik and Bouwer, Edward (June 2007). The Illusion of Certainty: Health Benefits andRisks. Springer-Verlag New York, LLC.World Health Organisation (2007).

Noise Pollution. Retrieved August 31, 2008, fromhttp://www.euro.who.int/Noise;