Altruism Essay

In this study we wanted to know the relationship of altruism and the well-being of an individual. Altruism is generally defined as any form of voluntary act intended to favor another without expectation of reward (Smith & Mackie, 200; Batson et al. 2002; Aronson et al. , 2004) Altruism is a specific kind of motivation to benefit another without consciously considering for one’s own self interest (Hall, 1999). Altruism refers to a kind of selfless help, which based on pure desire to help others (Aronson, Wilson, Akert, & Fehr, 2004). (Aronson et al. 004) have listed out some possible psychological benefit of helping, including increasing feeling of self-worth, maintaining social connection, gaining social approval and relieving one’s distress and guilty feeling. Neuberg et al. (1997) concluded that people are motivated to help others by their desire to make their own guilt or bad feelings go away rather than increase the well-being of another person Batson (1990) claims that altruism is selfless. He concluded that people help others simply because they care about them, not for any true benefit to themselves.

The joy experienced by the helper is not the goal of helping, but is a by-product of the act. Batson et al. (2002) found that the helpful acts of individuals who have been in close proximity with others who have experienced injustice can at times be truly altruistic It is believed that altruistic behavior would be more likely to be evoked when the helper is considered as an in-group member (Batson et. al. , 2001). However, it seems those helping situations involving self interest are more common in daily lives, which possibly cover the bright side of people (Sabibi 1195). (Batson et al. 2002, p. 488) said that, “the greater the empathic emotion, the greater the altruistic motivation. ” In other words, if people felt empathy, they will help regardless of whether it is in their interest to do s, even when the cost outweigh the rewards. (Allison and Goethals, 2011) (Bereczkei, Birkas and Kerekes, 2010; Haley and Fessler, 2005; Van Vugt and Hardy, 2010). The Challenge Hypothesis developed by Wingfield, Hegner, Dufty and Ball (1990) provides a framework for predicting the circumstances under which male “showing-off” via conspicuous self-sacrifice will be especially likely.

We Will Write a Custom Essay Specifically
For You For Only $13.90/page!


order now

According to this hypothesis, physiological changes such as a rise in testosterone occur in response to threats to a male’s status or the imminent threat of male-male competition, facilitating whatever competitive behaviors are necessary to meet the challenge. Although the theory was originally designed to explain aggressive behavior in animals, it appears to be applicable to human male behavior as well (Archer, 2006; Klinesmith, Kasser and McAndrew, 2006; McAndrew, 2009b).

This theoretical perspective has never been used as an explanatory mechanism for altruistic or heroic behavior, and it is our position that the mere possibility of male-male competition will increase the likelihood of competitive altruism. This theoretical perpectice has never been used as an explanatory. http://www. charis. wlc. edu/publications/symposium_spring01/richter1. pdf definition ng spiritual at mental well- being plus tigtatlong studies at dlawang theory. pasend ASAP. salamat:) A spiritual approach to life is correlated with wellbeing.

This point creates a positive correlation and crossover of principles between psychological well-being scales and (Christian) spiritual well-being scales, as the key commands of the Bible center around love. This will be shown in correlation between spiritual well-being and positive relations with others Based upon these criteria, the current study holds a (second) sub hypothesis that positive correlation will be found between purpose in life and spiritual well-being God-image for children and adolescents was impacted by parents and the child-parent relationship. In studies that have compared both intact and disrupted families, greater amounts of child dysfunction are associated with interparental discord than with actual marital disruption,” (Max, Brokaw, & McQueen, 1997). Spiritual well being and positive with others Based upon these criteria, the current study holds a (second) subhypothesis that positive correlation will be found those with an extrinsic end orientation were motivated to help others because they wanted to avoid shame and the social stigma held by others.

Schwartz (2003) found through the analysis of data, that “the act of giving to someone else may have mental health benefits because the very nature of focusing outside the self counters the self-focused nature of anxiety or depression” (p. 783). Although this study was limited due to the research design used and the specific sample selected, it has supported past research suggesting that religious individuals are likely to be altruistic and it has also explored an idea that was not researched before.

This study has set up a starting point for future research on the subject of altruism and its possible health benefits. Altruism is typically defined as selfless concern for others. It is close in meaning to what the influential social psychologist Erik Erikson (1963) called generativity, to refer to the individual’s concern for the welfare of future generations and for the world at large, and to the sociologist Pitrim Sorokin’s (1954/2002) notion of compassionate love.

Batson (1990) claims that altruism is selfless. He concluded that people help others simply because they care about them, not for any true benefit to themselves. The joy experienced by the helper is not the goal of helping, but is a by-product of the act. Batson et al. (2002) found that the helpful acts of individuals who have been in close proximity with others who have experienced injustice can at times be truly altruistic.

It is believed that altruistic behavior would be more likely to be evoked when the helper is considered as an in-group member (Batson et. al. , 2001). However, it seems those helping situations involving self interest are more common in daily lives, which possibly cover the bright side of people (Sabibi 1195). Neuberg et al. (1997) concluded that people are motivated to help others by their desire to make their own guilt or bad feelings go away rather than increase the well-being of another person.

x

Hi!
I'm Ruth!

Would you like to get a custom essay? How about receiving a customized one?

Check it out